The Metal Arts Guild (MAG) is an independent, non-profit, educational organization
of people who are skilled, interested, or share in the production and exhibition of metals.

Our Community

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Everyone is welcome to join: from the beginner to the master craftsperson, teachers and students, metal arts collectors and more. Each member is a vital part of making the Guild work for our community.

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We support the work of outstanding metal artists by organizing exhibitions, lectures, and workshops, awarding an annual MAG Community Project Grant, various student scholarships, and offering resources and opportunities for our members.

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MAG is a 501(c 3) non-profit, all-volunteer-led arts organization, and we rely on your generosity to help us provide metal related events, lectures, workshops, exhibitions and networking mixers to the membership and community.

Featured Member

Each month a new Featured Member is chosen from the completed member profiles on our website. Their interview and work is highlighted on our blog and social media. Visit our archive of past Featured Members.

November 2021

  • Bob Winston
  • Bob Winston
  • Bob Winston
  • Bob Winston
  • Bob Winston
  • Bob Winston
  • Bob Winston
  • Bob Winston

 

To start our celebration of the 70th anniversary of the Metal Arts Guild, we want to highlight the background of a few of its founding members

Bob Winston

Founding Member

“You can’t imagine anything, build up anything, design anything unless you’ve read it or experienced it in your life.” Bob Winston, quoted in The Times (San Francisco), December 6, 1997 [3]

Bob Winston (1915-2003) was an influential San Francisco Bay Area jeweler and sculptor, credited with reviving the process of lost wax, centrifugal casting in the context of mid-century American jewelry design. Born in Long Beach, California, he taught countless artists in his workshops and for 17 years at the California College of Arts and Crafts. His techniques and organic forms helped shape the look of wearable art and sculpture during the 1950s and 1960s.[2] In 1942, Bob Winston taught jewelry at the California College of Arts and Crafts (now known as the California College of Arts). Among his students were future MAG members Florence Resnikoff, Irena Brynner, and Robert Dhaemers — all of whom went on to teach jewelry themselves.[6]

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